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Since , she has been teaching and researching at Lucerne, Switzerland.

Introduction

Her current research concentrates on the conceptualisation and interplay of spatial mobilities, social power and inequality, materialities and the built environment as well as knowledge and discourse, drawing on the discourse and dispositif terms introduced by Michel Foucault. Other works include comparative analysis of mobility patterns in England and Switzerland and reflections on Bourdieu's relationality and geographical space. This seminar will explore young people's experiences and perceptions of transport, mobility and mobility constraints in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing on a three-country study Ghana, Malawi and South Africa which involved both adult and child researchers.

Following a review of the research methods employed, I will consider the diversity of young people's daily mobility experiences, relating these to a range of factors including gender, age, young people's incorporation in local economies, cultural context and local transport provision and examine the impact of mobility opportunities and constraints on young people's access to services notably education and livelihoods, and their potential for participation in social networks and peer culture.

Discussion will extend across a wide range of issues, from fear of rape or harassment on the journey to school, to the interconnectedness of mobilities across the life course and the impact of growing mobile phone use. She has long-standing research interests in transport and daily mobility among disadvantaged rural populations in sub-Saharan Africa particularly Nigeria and Ghana but has more recently extended her research into African urban transport issues.

Social policy is that which responds to social need and which aims to improve human welfare. Social policy can be understood as public policy that affects the well-being of members of society, by intervening to influence access to economic and other goods and resources. In the UK, social policy has traditionally been viewed in the context of Beveridge's five 'giant evils': disease, idleness, ignorance, squalor and want , leading to policy to rectify need in terms of health, employment, education, housing and poverty, respectively.

More recently, understanding of welfare has been expanded to consider wider influences upon welfare and the achievement of well-being. Cahill , has pioneered this 'new social policy': social policy which looks beyond the five giants to consider modern influences such as the environment, the information society, consumerism, leisure - and transport. This presentation contends that transport is social policy.

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Transport will be shown to influence the success of social policy that aims to tackle each of the five giants, but with a particular focus upon higher education in the UK, demonstrating an unbreakable link between transport and social development. Her subject specialisms include: transport and social policy; social exclusion; transport and time use, specifically, multitasking; and qualitative methodologies in transport. Susan began a year-long career break in January , to care for her two young children. However, she continues in her role as book reviews editor for the Journal of Transport Geography ; as a reviewer for international journals, conferences and funding councils; and she continues to write, publish and present.

The paper considers the role of mobility in the changing geographies of the legal figure of the "citizen. It focuses on the "relationships" that act of make up citizens - the relationships with both citizens' others, and with the material world that co-constitutes citizen mobilities. The citizen is a figure who stands at the intersection of three geographical imaginations - the imaginary of a sedentary nation, the imaginary of a heterogeneous city and the imaginary of free mobility in an interconnected world. This triple imaginary presents us with some paradoxes in the mobile world of the 21st Century.

I chart what happens to the citizen in changing constellations of mobility developing the notion of a "prosthetic citizen" as a mobile assemblage of body and world. His work inhabits the borderlands of the humanities and the social sciences focusing on the central geographical themes of place and mobility and the way in which they are constitutive of and constituted by social and cultural life. Many urban environments are being redesigned around a relatively new approach to street design termed shared space or, in the North American context, complete streets.

Shared space is a traffic engineering concept that eliminates physical barriers between motor vehicles, pedestrians, and other road users to encourage a sharing of street space. This presentation will explore this issue with specific reference to the case study evidence of research with people in different social and geographical contexts, who have been identified by policy makers as "socially excluded".

It is designed to provide a platform for the subsequent presentations in this TSU Annual Seminar Series, as well as to open up some new areas of discussion and debate in terms of the social value of transportation within contemporary society. She is noted for her pioneering social research on transport and social exclusion and the mobility needs of low income communities.

She has published an important book on this subjected entitled Running on Empty: transport, social exclusion and environmental justice , as well as many notable relevant journal articles. She has also won an EU Marie Curie Researcher Exchange award to develop new methods and indicators of transport exclusion through national comparison studies of cities in the UK, Belgium and Chile.

Modernity and its accompanying processes of differentiation and extension created the need to bridge increasing spatial distances through means of transportation and communication. In my presentation, I want to argue for an understanding of automobility as dispositif in the Foucauldian sense. This dispositif became constitutive for the socio-spatial formation and order in the western world in the second half of the 20th century.

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The conceptual framing emphasises the multiple interweavings of discursive knowledge, material structures, social practices and subjecti-fications as crucial for a sociological understanding of the car. Using mainly data from Germany, I will sketch the emergence of the automobile subject, who's long lasting undisputed hegemony has started to fade. Especially the new figure of the creative nomad equipped with various mobile technologies and connected to the internet presents a differently mobile subject. Against the background of the concept of automobility as dispositif, I will explore and compare these two figures in regards to their social preconditions and exclusions, thereby highlighting the inherent power structurations.

Katharina Manderscheid studied in Freiburg, Germany, and finished her PhD thesis on a topic of urban sociology in Since , she has been teaching and researching at Lucerne, Switzerland. Her current research concentrates on the conceptualisation and interplay of spatial mobilities, social power and inequality, materialities and the built environment as well as knowledge and discourse, drawing on the discourse and dispositif terms introduced by Michel Foucault. Other works include comparative analysis of mobility patterns in England and Switzerland and reflections on Bourdieu's relationality and geographical space.

This seminar will explore young people's experiences and perceptions of transport, mobility and mobility constraints in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing on a three-country study Ghana, Malawi and South Africa which involved both adult and child researchers. Following a review of the research methods employed, I will consider the diversity of young people's daily mobility experiences, relating these to a range of factors including gender, age, young people's incorporation in local economies, cultural context and local transport provision and examine the impact of mobility opportunities and constraints on young people's access to services notably education and livelihoods, and their potential for participation in social networks and peer culture.

Discussion will extend across a wide range of issues, from fear of rape or harassment on the journey to school, to the interconnectedness of mobilities across the life course and the impact of growing mobile phone use. She has long-standing research interests in transport and daily mobility among disadvantaged rural populations in sub-Saharan Africa particularly Nigeria and Ghana but has more recently extended her research into African urban transport issues. Social policy is that which responds to social need and which aims to improve human welfare.

Social policy can be understood as public policy that affects the well-being of members of society, by intervening to influence access to economic and other goods and resources. In the UK, social policy has traditionally been viewed in the context of Beveridge's five 'giant evils': disease, idleness, ignorance, squalor and want , leading to policy to rectify need in terms of health, employment, education, housing and poverty, respectively.

More recently, understanding of welfare has been expanded to consider wider influences upon welfare and the achievement of well-being. Cahill , has pioneered this 'new social policy': social policy which looks beyond the five giants to consider modern influences such as the environment, the information society, consumerism, leisure - and transport. Help us improve our products. Sign up to take part. The impact of the global financial crisis and the economic recession on Southern European countries has threatened the rural welfare of many regions.


  • Social inequalities and gender in relation to road risk.
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  • Manual Mobilities and Inequality (Transport and Society).
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The loss by emigration of the young population, austerity policies, and the territorial concentration of essential services have led many of rural areas into a spiral of decline. The growth of regional disparities, even among rural areas, is confirmed by the European official reports. Depopulation and rural decline are highly associated with remoteness. Accessibility is one key issue to mitigating this erosion of socio-territorial cohesion; another is mobility, which is the usual way to confront the scarce opportunities and limited services in deeply rural territories.

This paper pays attention to socio-territorial inequalities and considers as working hypothesis that social rights are differentiated by the habitat structure; as a result, territory determines different degrees of citizenship. Traditional perspectives focused on the access to productive resources and material opportunities as the source of disadvantages, but we suggest that a more comprehensive approach is needed to address the rural gap: the difference between living conditions and living expectations in rural areas in contrast with urban ones.


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We address two main processes involved on it. On the one hand, there are strong interconnections between physical and social mobility, such as commuting to distant labor markets and educative centers, which could increase the social mobility of rural youth. On the other hand, the maps of the provision of services, infrastructures networks and investments not only reshape the territories but also their sociological morphologies. Accessibility and mobility are strongly linked with rural well-being and social sustainability. We explore and illustrate these questions with examples from the Spanish case.

The text is structured into four issues regarding the rural gap: the territorial imbalance and social cohesion, the demographic imbalance and rural welfare as the product of the inter-generational equilibrium, the rural disparities in accessibility and the challenges of mobility transition. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the rural policies and governance required for achieving social and territorial balance.

In twenty-first century Europe, the rural world continues to be seen as a problem. Almost three decades later, the new Cork 2. The first report brought about the implementation of rural development policies, but the last Cork Declaration demonstrates the insufficient economic development, which despite improving and adapting rural economies, has been unable to reduce population loss.

Now the challenge is to improve the conditions for the quality of rural life. In terms of vital opportunities, rural habitat continues to maintain notable differences over urban areas. In this sense, we can speak of the rural gap. On the one hand, in the sphere of economic development because of the persistence of the rural penalty.

As noted by Hite or Malecki , distance and low population density affect socioeconomic differences. On the other hand, these features of rural habitats—small villages, dispersed population, and low density—have not allowed an equal integration in the conditions of the welfare state Shucksmith and Chapman, That is, in rural areas, there are not only fewer employment or consumption opportunities but also regarding welfare conditions, for example, greater difficulties in the work and family reconciliation and accessibility to public services and resources.

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The OECD report insists on pointing out the gap produced by distance to urban centers in terms of economic dynamism and its extension to living standards and well-being. The rural gap is primarily a problem of social inequality and, politically, it has turned from being considered as a question of economic development, to being seen as an issue of social cohesion.

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For example, depopulation has been introduced into the agenda and into the traditional actions of the first and second pillar of the Common Agricultural Policy. Modulations have been established in the application of European Structural and Investment Funds ESI funds for sparsely populated regions with less than 50 inhabitants per km 2 , and for very sparsely populated with a density of less than 8 inhabitants per km 2 — Margaras, Social inequalities are not only of an economic nature; they also include the conditions of social reproduction and cultural distinction Savage et al.

This paper is an approach to the rural gap from the understanding that social inequalities are not static but determined in every moment and place and, as Green and Hulme pointed out, are continuously produced.